Do you stand at the end of a wedding ceremony?

How do you end a wedding ceremony?

Most pronouncements end with the line, “You may now kiss the bride!” If that gives you the icks (and we totally get why it might), you don’t have to include it. You can remove the line altogether or change it to: You may seal your promise/union/marriage with a kiss. And now for your first kiss as a married couple.

Do you stand when the bride and groom exit?

It is considered APPROPRIATE to stand at the end of the wedding for the recessional, where oftentimes the guests are clapping and singing!

Why do we say you may now kiss the bride?

The Origin of the First Kiss

Back then, it was customary for the priest to give a holy “kiss of peace” to the groom, who would then pass the kiss on the bride. This was done to bless the marriage inside of the church, giving way to the common phrase heard today at most ceremonies: “You may now kiss the bride.”

Who walks the groom’s mother down the aisle?

The groom’s parents precede the bride’s mother during the processional. Here’s a rundown: After the ushers have seated all of the guests, the grandparents start up the aisle, followed by the groom’s parents. Then the bride’s mother takes her turn. She is the last to be seated before the bridal party procession begins.

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What should you not wear to a wedding?

By avoiding these fashion faux-pas, you will make a tasteful fashion statement and show respect for the bride and groom.

  • White. One of the most obvious mistakes at a wedding is to match the bride. …
  • A Black Tuxedo. …
  • Anything Too Revealing. …
  • Denim or Jeans. …
  • Low-Cut Outfits. …
  • Sheer Material. …
  • All Black. …
  • Flip Flops.

What is the etiquette for inviting guests to a wedding?

It is common courtesy to invite your immediate family, wedding party, and the officiant to the event, but if budget and space allow, feel free to include the entire guest list. In fact, many couples are now fusing the rehearsal dinner with a welcome party, allowing guests to mix and mingle prior to the big day.